Archive for the ‘ Remembering ’65 ’ Category

Remembering ’65: World Series Game 7 — Dodgers win it all

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Game 7 finalBy Jon Weisman

Koufax. Johnson. Championship.

This is the last tale from “Remembering ’65,” and the one you know the best.

Fifty years ago today, working on two days’ rest in Minnesota, backed by Sweet Lou Johnson’s fourth-inning home run, Sandy Koufax pitched a 2-0 shutout over the Twins to give the Dodgers the 1965 World Series title, their fourth in the past 11 seasons.

“Alston Leans to Left and Koufax Proves He’s Right,” read the headline in the Times, regarding Dodger manager Walter Alston’s decision to start Koufax over Don Drysdale. But that result was anything but a given as the game unfolded.
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Remembering ’65: World Series Game 6

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By Jon Weisman

In 1965, Sandy Koufax showed he could pitch on two days’ rest. Don Drysdale showed he could be his own run support.

In Game 6 of the 1965 World Series, Minnesota righty Mudcat Grant showed he could do both.

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Remembering ’65: World Series Game 5

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By Jon Weisman

Pretty much the only drama in Game 5 of the 1965 World Series was whether Sandy Koufax would throw another perfect game or no-hitter.

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Remembering ’65: World Series Game 4

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By Jon Weisman

After lasting only 2 2/3 innings in Game 1 of the 1965 World Series, Don Drysdale was his old self in Game 4.

Even better, the Dodger offense was a punishing crew, too.

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Remembering ’65: World Series Game 3, starring Claude Osteen

remembering-65-wide-v1-jersey1970 Headshots: Alan Foster, Claude Osteen, Don Sutton, Bill Singer, Joe Moeller, Jim Brewer, Pete Mikkelsen, Ray Lamb.

By Mark Langill

If Clayton Kershaw and Zack Greinke are this generation’s version of Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdale for Dodger fans, the question entering the postseason is who might play the role of Claude Osteen?

During his MLB career from 1957-1976, Osteen logged more than 3,400 regular-season innings with the Reds, Senators, Dodgers, Astros, Cardinals and White Sox. But nine scoreless innings in October 50 years ago represent Osteen’s pinnacle and arguably the most overlooked pitching performance in L.A. Dodger history.

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Remembering ’65: World Series Game 2

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By Jon Weisman

Pummeled mercilessly in Game 1 of the 1965 World Series, the Dodgers could console themselves by handing Game 2 to Sandy Koufax, who had just completed one of the most memorable seasons in baseball history — a 2.04 ERA, a perfect game and a big-league record 382 strikeouts.

Koufax had clinched the National League pennant for the Dodgers with a complete game on two days’ rest, capping a stretch in which he threw 27 innings in only eight days, allowing one run and striking out 38.

The brilliant lefty, whose entire season had seemed in jeopardy back in April, had logged 335 2/3 innings overall, the most by any Major Leaguer in more than a decade and the fourth-highest total since World War II. Seemingly, however, he had gone from brittle to indefatigable, and with a full four days’ rest heading into his Game 2 start, on October 7, 1965, confidence was high.

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Remembering ’65: World Series Game 1

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By Jon Weisman

The Minnesota Twins were the highest-scoring team in the American League in 1965, so even though the Dodgers — winners of 15 of their final 16 regular season games — were listed as a favorite to win the World Series, Twins manager Sam Dele was undaunted.

“We don’t expect to lose,” Twins manager Sam Mele told a reporter, according to Charles Maher of the Times.

The reporter kept looking at Mele, expecting him to go on.

“Hey,” Mele said. “You didn’t write that down.”

The reporter wrote it down.

Though the Dodgers had Sandy Koufax and Don Drysdale, not to mention several other tried-and-true World Series veterans compared with the inexperienced Twins, the Los Angeles offense remained a concern.

“If a guy like (Maury) Wills scores only 92 runs, it must mean he is not getting driven in much,” Mele said.

“On that club,” a reporter replied, “nobody got driven in much.”

As it turned out, the one thing the Dodgers didn’t really worry about betrayed them. Fifty years ago today, on October 6, 1965, Drysdale was knocked out of Game 1.

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Remembering ’65: Koufax for the pennant, on two days’ rest

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By Jon Weisman

Having won nine straight games, coming from 4 1/2 games back 10 days earlier to tie the Giants for the National League lead on September 26, 1965, the Dodgers still had work to do.

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Remembering ’65: Tied!

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By Jon Weisman

“Breathing defiance in the face of the Giants’ seemingly insurmountable lead,” wrote Frank Finch in the September 24 edition of the Times, “the doughty Dodgers face the Cardinals tonight to open their final homestand of the gruelling, grinding National League campaign.”

Already, the Dodgers had made progress, trimming a 4 1/2-game deficit to two games. But their defiance was matched, and then some, by the Giants, according to UPI.
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Remembering ’65: Nearly abandoned, Dodgers win with abandon

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By Jon Weisman

When the 1965 Dodgers woke up the morning of September 16, they were a season-high 4 1/2 games out of first place with 16 left to play.

Their rivals to the north, the San Francisco Giants, had won 13 games in a row, asserting authority over the National League pennant race.

It had to be a desolate feeling for Los Angeles. Leading the NL for most of the season, the Dodgers were at serious risk of becoming an afterthought.

As if to underscore the moment, when they went out to play the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field that afternoon, the announced attendance that day was barely enough for a hay wagon, let alone a bandwagon.

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